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Employment thoughts…

Filed under Professional Happenings

One of the major aspects of a Blog is that of exchanging ideas and looking for a topic that might cause the hormones of different individuals to become excited about wishing to express their emotions.

The world is full of questions. For instance I was reading the list of ideas individuals had for preparing for a job interview. How many times have you applied for a job knowing full well that the job was already gone, and your efforts were just meeting the companies quota for applicants to be interviewed? When I started off I use to save my rejection letters (don’t ask me why … I am a pack-rat)but it got to be so many boxes full that I decided it wasn’t worth it.

OR … even though I am not looking for a job (I read the job market to actually see what the economy of the country is like … beats listening to politicians [From either party]. Anyhow, you see certain jobs come open over and over again. You have to wonder if the job is that poor, the employer is not paying, or the position is a perfect steping stone for a new position.

Why do you look for a job?????

Why does an employer ask questions that once you get the job you find have no meaning to the position?

Comments

  • Amanda W says:

    I totally agree with you there. There are alot of positions the HR requires they post yet they have already been filled “in-house”. My biggest concern is the people trying to get in at entry-level like myself. Any and all positions seem to require 5 years or more. I completely understand why labs would want someone experienced, but at a recent IAI conference there werent many younger faces that is the future of forensic labs. I think some entry level position would be good to have because you are a clean slate, I know many dept do things differently, but if a entry-level employee comes in you get to teach them exactly how you want things done.

    Can’t an employer take the time and teach the next generation of CSIs?

  • Lorraine says:

    I respectfully disagree that many positions are ‘pre-filled’ in-house. This has never been my experience in the forensic field and I have moved around a lot. However, I do completely understand why employers only hire a fairly minimal number of entry level positions. In my area of specialization (DNA), it takes a minimum of 1 year before a new hire with no previous experience is able to make a significant contribution to case work within the laboratory. During this time, more experienced employees are distracted from their casework by training the new employees. Then, almost as soon as the new employees before ‘qualified’ they often leave to get the job they really wanted that they just ‘needed to get experience for’! I must admit I myself did this at my first forensic job (there were some ‘extenuating circumstance’) and my employer now requires the signing of a contract for new employees, but even these contacts can be very difficult to enforce.

  • Chuck C says:

    I can really relate to everyones concerns, I applied and interview for a job as a Community Service Specialist in Boise Idaho. I have 12 years of law enforcement and going to school for a BS-Biology, I performed very well during the interviews and come to find out the person in charge of the CSS program, hates police officers and especially tose that may cause her waves and think about what they are doing.
    Even though there are a lot of good people looking to break into the field of Forensic Science, there are just as many of us with the field experience and still can’t find work. Good Luck to all.

  • Chris Armstrong says:

    In response to what Lorraine wrote about new employees being trained, I think that it would be important to train incoming employees correctly even if it does take time. I graduated from Grossmont Community College in San Diego, CA with an AS in Forensic Technologies and it has been really difficult to find any kind of job that doesn’t require a BS degree or some experience. The problem is, how am I supposed to get my experience without getting the chance. I am currently going to the University of Kansas to earn my BS, but I feel like I have enough knowledge that could help me at an entry level position if I could get the opportunity. I just recently applied for a CSI in Huntington Beach, CA that didn’t require a BS degree, but I know that there are going to probably be hundreds of applications for them to look over and I don’t think I will even be considered. Although it is an entry level position I still think that they will want someone that has more experience than I do. It is a double-edged sword. It is frustrating, but I keep up hope.

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  • מוצרי פרסום says:

    I respectfully disagree that many positions are ‘pre-filled’ in-house. This has never been my experience in the forensic field and I have moved around a lot. However, I do completely understand why employers only hire a fairly minimal number of entry level positions. In my area of specialization (DNA), it takes a minimum of 1 year before a new hire with no previous experience is able to make a significant contribution to case work within the laboratory. During this time, more experienced employees are distracted from their casework by training the new employees. Then, almost as soon as the new employees before ‘qualified’ they often leave to get the job they really wanted that they just ‘needed to get experience for’! I must admit I myself did this at my first forensic job (there were some ‘extenuating circumstance’) and my employer now requires the signing of a contract for new employees, but even these contacts can be very difficult to enforce.

  • Kody says:

    i have the same question
    Why does an employer ask questions that once you get the job you find have no meaning to the position?

  • Dan Malloy says:

    Emlpoyers who are in reputable positions generally have their system in place to gleen as much info as possible, and some might seem absurd or irrelevant to the outside world..

  • Brady Skinner says:

    Dear UF Forensic Science Following,
    I am about to start my last semester in the forensic science masters program and have begun the long process of job searching. I am looking to relocate to Washington, DC and was wondering if anybody knew of any jobs or had any connections in the area? Right now I am applying to everything I can find but have had no luck. Please help!

    Thanks,
    Brady Skinner
    brady.david.skinner@gmail.com

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